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LudeSPEED Performance ~99-01 (Archive)

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MustardCat
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LudeSPEED Performance ~99-01 (Archive)

#1

Post by MustardCat » 22 Nov 2017, 06:08

ATTN: This is an information dump from the old LudeSPEED site, none of this stuff is sold anymore. Much of the information is waaay out of date.


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contact info: Tom@LudeSPEED.com
phone: 386-956-0089

LudeSPEED offers a variety of products and services for the import performance market.
Please follow the links to find what you need for your import.

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LudeSPEED Camber Correction Kit
Fits 1988-1991 Honda Prelude S,Si
$195 Plus Shipping

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Have you lowered your Prelude?

Do you have bad negative Camber?

Are you tired of wearing out your expensive tires in 6 months?

If you answered yes to the questions above, then you need to read on. I have your solution. You need a camber correction kit for your 88-91 Prelude and I make them so you can get one here! Please read on or CLICK HERE to find out more.
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These are the completes control arms. The arms on the top are for the rear suspension and the lower arms are for the front. Pretty, aren't they?

The suspension on the Honda Prelude is like most other suspensions, only quite a bit better! But as good as it is, it was not designed to ride on shorter springs. So when lowering springs are installed to drop the car, it may look good and may handle great but the tires' life is going to be shortened in a HUGE way. Everyone that has lowered their Prelude more than 1 1/2 inches know EXACTLY what I am talking about.
This uneven tire wear happens because of negative camber. That means that the top of the tire is more towards the center of the car than the bottom of the tire is. This happens because the control arms that hold the spindle in place are not even in length. The bottom control arm is about twice as long as the upper control arm. If they were equal length, then the car would have perfect nuetral camber at all times.
Anyway, when you lower your car, you need a longer upper control arm to correct the negative camber that you now have. But even better than that would be one that is adjustable for the amount that you have lowered your car. That is what I am offering. I have made an adjustable upper control arm that adjusts the camber from the stock ride height to a full 3 inches of drop! That is alot. No other camber correction kit can boast that.

Some Preludes with some BAD negative camber:
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The car on the left has severe negative camber in the back and the car on the right has severe negative camber in the front.


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This car has CRAZY camber problems. Owner claims a 5 inch drop! Click on the thumb to see larger pic. My regular camber kit will not fix this but I offered to do a custom set for him. If he accepts, I will post pics of the car with the kit installed.




Lude Speed camber correction kits are a direct replacement of your four stock upper control arms, also known as A-arms. They are a direct bolt on mod that will allow you to lower your Prelude up to 3.5 inches and still be able to have nuetral camber or 0 degrees. I have verified the 3 inch drop on my own car by removing the spring and simulating a 3inch drop while the car was on the lift. Should you ever decide to go back to stock springs, they can be adjusted back to stock settings as well.

Feedback

All of the feedback I have recieved about the kit has been great. Alignment shops are thoroughly impressed with the design, ontruction and ease of adjustment of the kit. Here is what one customer said about the technician at Butler Tire Co. in Doraville, GA -

"He said the installation was extremely easy. He immediately informed me that the camber kit on the car was one of the best-built, sturdiest camber kit he had ever seen. He asked where I had got it. Hehe...I told him they were made by a guy named Tom :) and that he was an expert on 3rd gen Preludes, of course. Just to make it even better, this shop was a top-notch place where people bring in fancy shit. For him to say that, I thought, was very impressive. The guy was astonished."

Very kind words, I must say - TOM

TECH DETAILS - click on picture
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Click on the picture to read about the technical details of the new control arms.

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Here is a SUPER NICE 90 Prelude that I installed a camber kit on. It has Neuspeed race springs which drop the car approximately 2.5 inches. The owner has not had it professionally aligned yet but it looks great and he is very happy with the results.


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This is Paul's car BEFORE he installed the camber kit. The pictures below are after the kit was installed.
Click on the pics to see larger version.


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The red 89 in the pictures belongs to a friend in New Hampshire. This is the actual car that tested a couple different designs for me. This car has a 2" drop and you can see that there is no negative camber. This car is also equipped with 4WS and the camber kit is completely compatible with the 4WS system. To see more pictures of this immaculate Prelude, Click Here.



How much does it cost you ask?

The price for the four custom upper control arms is:
$195
plus shiping.
Email me for payment options and your address.




Email me with any questions that you have: Tom@LudeSPEED.com



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Is your car making good power? Are you tired of spinning one lame tire? Tired of the normal FWD corner action where the car pushes to the outside while spinning the inside tire when you want it to pull through the corner? This will fix it!

I know in my car with the turbo pushing a measely 9psi, one tire would spin when I floored it in 1st gear. If I speed-shifted to 2nd, it would spin all the way until I needed to shift to 3rd. Needless to say, I couldn't win many races like that. So I did some research and found a factory Honda LSD that can be modified a tiny bit to fit in the 3rd gen Prelude transmission. So I am offering a Limited Slip Differential kit for the 88-91 Prelude Si.

The kit includes:
New LSD Unit
Modified Ring Gear

Cost: $850 plus shipping.

You can return your old differential and ring gear and I will return $50


BEWARE:DO NOT buy the Phantom Grip LSD. It is total crap! Here is my story about my Phantom Grip LSD:

I bought it for $225 and I was excited. I recieved it then spent 8 HOURS installing it. I took my car for a drive and it spun one wheel just like nothing was in there! Even at the track after wetting the tires it wouldn't spin both. So then I find out that the guy sent me the wrong one. At that point I didn't blame the PG LSD. So I spent ANOTHER 8 hours pulling it out to fix it. If you look at the pic below, you can kinda see how it works. It is 2 plates that are pushed apart by 4 springs. So I figured that since I had the wrong one, it must be too thin and the springs weren't pushing enough. So I put washers under the springs so they applied more pressure. It was SOO tight that it almost didn't fit in the stock diff. So I went for a test drive and it WORKED!! I was happy. It even pulled through corners like a car with LSD. BUT That only lasted for 2 WEEKS!!!!!!!!!!!! So now I'm PISSED! I spent $250 on junk, spent 16 hours trying to get it to work and it doesn't. AND now it is stuck in my transmission and I just want it out. It would take ANOTHER 8 hours to get it out. So a total of $250 and 24 hours work for a piece of shit that doesn't work. SCREW THAT!!!!!

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Phantom Grip LSD pictured above



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LudeSPEED offers several specialized services.
Services that are available:

Installation - We can install any of our products, as well as suspension, clutches, cams, cam gears, intakes, electronics and any other performance product on virtually any car.

Custom Fabrication -We can fabricate custom turbo piping, intercooler piping, mounts for intercoolers, modified intercooler outlets, intake piping, exhaust, custom suspension components and almost anything that a customer can dream up.

Custom Jobs -some custom jobs that have been completed:
Custom turbo plumbing for my own 88 Prelude Si
Custom motor mounts to fit a B18A motor in an 89 CRX
Custom downpipe, exhaust piping, intercooler piping, and installation of other turbo system components on an 89 CRX. The customer already installed a B21A1 Prelude motor and modified a 2nd Gen Eclipse turbo manifold so that it fit on the Prelude motor. Also modified the stock T25 wastegate so that it would not boost ovr 9psi
Custom T3/T4 manifold, downpipe and intercooler piping for a 92 Civic Si hatch back that had a B16 motor.
Eliminator Downpipe for a 95 Eclipse GS-T.
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All Install Work is $30 Per Hour
All Fabrication Work is $40 Per Hour Plus Materials



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I started LudeSPEED Performance while working as a PC/LAN Analyst at Disney in Orlando, FL. I had driven a Honda Prelude for five years and that was the first car that I turbocharged in April of 1999. Hence the name LudeSPEED. I developed my first turbo system and I must say it has some major flaws! I attempted to make an equla length header and what resulted was a mess. It worked well but it took up ALOT of room and only lasted a month before it cracked.

My 2nd attempt was a 100% improvement. This was in September of 1999. At that time I became excited about the prospect of producing and selling aftermarket, bolt on turbokits. From the beginning, my goal was to make a kit that was as simple as possible to install and tune. This helps the average enthusiast succeed through the whole process. So I started to make kits on the side, while continuing to work in the IT field. Then the orders were coming faster than I could fill them while only working on them 2 days a week, so I quit my job.

I had been selling Prelude turbo kits for several months when a friend bought a new 1999 Subaru Impreza RS 2.5 He brought it by to see what would have to be done to turbocharge it. Well, it was obvious that it was going to be pretty simple compared to a Honda. Anyway, over Labor Day weekend in we made the kit. The owner wanted to use a factory Legacy turbo, so I made the piping to fit that turbo on the car. It was a success. We had a small oil drain problem at first, but corrected it and I have been using that corrected method ever since.

I took pics of the kit, made flyers and we headed to an import race in West Palm Beach. He was on the I-club at the time and knew of a Subaru meet for the event. So I got to hand out some flyers and talk to some RS owners. Unfortunately, there was no serious interest. So I turned to the Impreza Owners Club. I posted that I was interested in making a turbo kit for the RS, and asked for feedback from interested buyers. There was a particular member who offered MUCH advise on getting a group buy together, and what to say in the posts. So with his help, a group buy materialized. There were 14 participants. A local RS owner contacted me and wanted to be the R&D car. He dropped the car off and the first kit was made. I used those parts to make jigs so that other kits could be made. I will admit that it took longer than expected to get all the kits out, but that was the first time I had done any production with a volume of that size.

I did get a lot of feedback from the customers about certain issues. I used that feedback to make the needed adjustments for parts that did not fit or perform as expected. That is where we are today. 20 RS turbo kits have been sold. The first 14 were all made the same. #15 addressed some issues and was an improvement. Each kit has imporved i some way over previous kits, therefore #20 was the best so far. I made several large changes that had a big impact on fitment and quality. I actually saw the kit installed on the car at the NOPI Nationals car show. Even I was surprised at how well ALL the parts fit. I was happy and more importantly, so was the owner. I hope to continue to develop the turbo kit as well as new products for the Impreza RS and possibly the new WRX.
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Provide customers with quality products at an affordable price.

Provide customers with proper customer service.

To use customers’ feedback to make improvements to existing products and develop new products to satisfy the customers’ needs.

Keep customers informed of their order status and delivery products in a timely manner.




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MustardCat
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Re: LudeSPEED Performance ~99-01 (Archive)

#2

Post by MustardCat » 22 Nov 2017, 06:11

ARTICLES:

Why Turbo Motors Blow Up

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There are alot of people that put turbo on thier Hondas and blow the motor within a month or possibly even a couple weeks. This gives Hondas the reputation that they are not reliable when turbocharged. Why does this happen? Why did the motor blow up so soon?

I'll tell you why. Say someone has a Civic EX, GS-R or the new Civic Si. They buy a turbo from DRAG and install it. That turbo kit is designed to run 8psi. The fuel system that comes with that kit is an inline Bosch fuel pump and Vortech FMU. That system is good for the 8psi that the kit is setup to run. The owner of the car is running around hauling ass, boosting in every gear and loving it. Then they start to think "if runs this good at 8psi, I wonder how it runs at 9psi". Then they turn the boost up. The motor doens't blow at this point, it just makes more power. Then they think "man it runs good and it idn't blow up at 9 psi so let me turn it up to 10psi". Now keep in mind that all they are doing is turning up the boost, they aren't doing anything to add more fuel. And no more fuel is being added because thier setup is maxxed out. The combo of the pump and FMU is not going to give any more fuel, no matter what. Finally, they turn it to 11psi and it runs for about one day and then BOOM, blows a piston. I just read something that a shop published and it said "a motor will be making the most power the instant before the pistons melts."

Now they start to blame the Honda motor and DRAG for building a shitty turbo kit that blew thier motor. The fact is that their motor would probably run fine for 100k miles with the turbo if they just left it at 8psi as it was designed because it did not run lean at 8psi.

I have talked to several people that did EXACTLY as I just described and ended up with a blown motor. Most of them owned Civic Si's. I even did it and blew a piston. But there are MANY people that stay within the safe boost limits and make gobs of power and do not blow the motor. Then there are people that go through the time and expense to upgrade the fuel system to deliver more fuel and then they safely turn the boost up to as much as 24psi on some motors. I have talked to more than one person that has run 28psi on a stock GS-R motor and runs 18-20psi daily on the same motor. Why? Because he has it tuned correctly.

Another example is Nelo from West Palm Beach who has a 93 VTEC Prelude. He has an F-Max turbo kit and he runs 15psi on that stock motor all the time. The car runs 12.70's with full interior and all power accessories still working. His motor is totally stock.

I am currently running 12psi on my motor. The motor is 100% stock and is holding up okay because I made sure it was getting enought fuel.


So the point of this little article is to straighten out some common misconceptions about stock motors that are turbocharged.

IF YOU ADD ENOUGH FUEL, YOU CAN RUN AS MUCH AS 20PSI EVEN ON STOCK MOTORS!!!!

Please note that the higher boost levels will wear the motor more and the chance of something going wrong does increase. But all in all, if you keep everything in working order, 15psi should be safe even on a stock motor. I am not recommending this because you could blow it up if something goes wrong. I am just telling you what I was able to run it at and what other people have been able to run. Please make your decisions wisely and do not raise the boost just because I said it was okay.

I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR WHAT HAPPENS TO YOUR MOTOR IF YOU DECIDE TO TURN UP THE BOOST!!!!!!!!

Copyright © Tom Coleman 2000



Stock Fuel Pump Evaluation

HOME


Here is what I have found about the factory Prelude fuel pump.
It works GREAT for non-turbo cars and it even worked good with the turbo up to 6psi with no intercooler. I ran my car with the stock pump for about 8 months without problems (as long as I kept the boost below 8psi). I also had the stock cat convertor in place. That restricted the exhaust enough that the turbo only made 6psi. Even when I turned the boost to 8psi, it did not seem to detonate with this setup.
Then I installed a high-flow 2.5 inch cat. WOW! Boost instantly jumped to 7psi with a peak of 8psi. I still had no intercooler. With it setup like this, it was running dangerously lean. I have an Air/Fuel Ratio meter in the car and under full throttle, it went completely lean. Now that I had this extra boost and exhaust flow, I needed more fuel.
It just so happens that I had an in-line Bosch fuel pump on my shelf. I bought it from a guy that had a used DRAG turbo kit that he was parting out. I had heard good things about this pump and the price was only $90 so I bought it. I had planned on putting it on my other Prelude but I took it apart before I ever got to install the pump, so it sat on my shelf for almost a full year.
I installed the pump in-line and I left the stock fuel pump hooked up in the gas tank. I put the Bosch pump under the hood in the hose that comes out of the fuel filter and goes into the fuel rail. When I installed the pump, the motor instantly ran WAY better. It did not run lean anymore and made alot more power. So right away, with no other changes it was alot better with the high-flow pump.
Then I installed the intercooler. Since the intercooler makes the air going into the engine colder, it has more oxygen per volume than without the intercooler. When more oxygen goes into the motor, more fuel is needed. The car ran good at 8psi but now it was running rich! So that pump was just slamming the fuel in there. I turned the boost up to 10psi and it just SCREAMED. I loved it. I drove it like that for a couple months.
Then I read that when the Bosch inline pump is used, you are supposed to remove the factory pump because it actually restricts fuel to the Bosch pump.
I was doing some work on the car and chose to remove the Bosch pump because I plan to move it to the fuel tank. So right now I am running the stock pump again. It is running WAY too lean with the stock pump even at 7psi. I don't even like driving it like that. So that is the limitation of the factory pump, can't even support an intercooled 7psi using the stock injectors and a rising-rate fuel pressure regulator.
So that is next, I am going to remove the factory pump and remount the Bosch pump just outside the fuel tank. I am pretty sure I will be able to run 12psi like that. I will update this page when I get the pump mounted where it needs to be. I am not using the holley pump because I already have the Boscg pump and can't spare the cash to get the Holley pump.



Electronic Tuning Tools

HOME

I have recently learned the value of quality electronic tuning devices like the APEXi S-AFC, Field SFC and Hypertech Shogun Power Tuner. Devices such as these tap into various wires that either go from sensors into the ECU or wires coming out of the ECU such as the actual injector signal wires. They allow you tune the fuel curve at certain rpm's so you can add fuel where the motor needs it and lean it out when it is rich.
I used to think that mechanical devices such as resistors or bleeder valves would work as well. I tried the mechanical devices because they are cheap as hell, and I did eventually get them to work. But they don't work ANYTHING like the electronics. My first experience with an electronic tuning device was when I fabricated a turbo system for my friend who has a '99 Subaru RS. He bought the Field SFC. When we got the turbo plumbing worked out we went for a drive to tune the SFC and it was COOL AS HELL.

Before we did anything with the SFC, the motor would detonate at anything above 3500rpm under boost. Then we went through each RPM point and made the adjustments so it ran richer. We chose to be safe and set it at levels that we knew would be over-rich, then we worked towards leaning it out. This worked very well. It is really cool to make adjustments and to see instant results on the Air/Fuel ratio meter and in the feel of the power.

I have since installed an Apexi Super AFC in my Prelude. I LOVE it and recommend it to everyone that asks me what to get to tune the car. It allows FINE fuel tuning, which is important for making power. It was even more valuable to me, since I was running turbo and larger injectors. Without it, my car would run VERY rich and bog when going from cruising to full boost. At anything but full boost, it was horrible until I tuned it with the S-AFC. When I got it working correctly and was running 15psi, the car was insane. There are other cars (Civics, I don't know of any Prelude running that much boost) running 22psi with the same setup. It is a powerful tuning tool. GET ONE!!!!


Copyright © Tom Coleman 2000



Air/Liquid Intercooler Tech

Article coutesy of

HOME

Water/air intercooling is used less frequently than the air/air approach. However, it has several benefits, especially in cramped engine bays. A water/air intercooler uses a compact heat exchanger located under the bonnet and normally placed in-line with the compressor-to-throttle body path. The heat is transferred to water which is then pumped through a dedicated front-mounted radiator cooled by the airflow generated by the car's movement. A water/air intercooler system consists of these major parts: the heat exchanger, radiator, pump, control system, and plumbing.

Technically, a water/air intercooler has some distinct cooling advantages on road cars. Water has a much higher specific heat value than air. The 'specific heat value' figure shows how much energy a substance can absorb for each degree temp it rises by. A substance good at absorbing energy has a high specific heat value, while one that gets hot quickly has a low specific heat. Something with a high specific heat value can obviously absorb (and then later get rid of) lots of energy - good for cooling down the air.

Air has a specific heat value of 1.01 (at a constant pressure), while the figure for water is 4.18. In other words, for each increase in temp by one degree, the same mass of water can absorb some four times more energy than air. Or, there can be vastly less flow of water than air to get the same job done. Incidentally, note that pure water is best - its specific heat value is actually degraded by 6 per cent when 23 per cent anti-freeze is added! Other commonly-available fluids don't even come close to water's specific heat value.

The high specific heat value of water has a real advantage in its heat sinking affect. An air/water heat exchanger designed so that it has a reasonable volume of water within it can absorb a great deal of heat during a boost spike. Even before the water pump has a chance to transfer in cool water, the heat exchanger has absorbed considerable heat from the intake airstream. It's this characteristic that makes a water/air intercooling system as efficient in normal urban driving with the pump stopped as it is with it running! To explain, the water in the heat exchanger absorbs the heat from the boosted air, feeding it back into the airstream once the car is off boost and the intake air is cooler. I am not suggesting that you don't worry about fitting a water pump, but it is a reminder that in normal driving the intercooler works in a quite different way to how it needs to perform during sustained full throttle. However, the downside of this is once the water in the system has got hot (for example, after you've been driving and then parked for a while), it takes some time for the water to cool down once you again drive off.

The Heat Exchanger

Off the shelf water/air heat exchangers are much rarer than air/air types. Water/air intercooling has been used in cars produced by Lotus, Subaru and Toyota. A few aftermarket manufacturers also produce them. If you want to make your own, the easiest way to go about it is to jacket an air/air core. Pick an air/air intercooler that uses a fairly compact core that still flows well. If it uses cast alloy end tanks (as opposed to pressed sheet aluminium) then so much the better. (Plastic end tank types need not apply!) The core is then enclosed in 3mm aluminium sheet, TIG welded into place. Water attachment points can be made by welding alloy blocks to the sheet metal, with these blocks then drilled and tapped to take barbed hose fittings. Pressure-test the water jacket to make sure that it actually does seal, and make sure that the water flow from one hose fitting to the other can't bypass the core. Small baffles can be used to ensure that the water does fully circulate before exiting.

Another type of water/air heat exchanger can be made using a copper tube stack. These small heat exchangers are normally used to cool boat engine oil, exchanging the heat with engine coolant or river or seawater. While the complete unit uses a cast iron enclosure and so is too heavy and large for car applications, the core piece itself can be enclosed to make a very efficient heat exchanger. Comprising a whole series of small-bore copper tubes joining two endplates, the core is cylindrical in shape and relatively easy to package. The induction air flows through the tubes while a water-tight sheet metal jacket can be soldered around the cylinder. The resulting heat exchanger is a little like a steam engine boiler, with induction air instead of fire passing down the boiler tubes! The one here is shown installed on a car undergoing fuel pump testing.

As with air/air designs, the more efficient that you can make the heat exchanger, the better is the potential system performance. If you plan to use an off-the-shelf heat exchanger that has specifications available for it, you will be interested to know that the 150kW turbo Subaru Liberty (Legacy) RS uses a factory-fitted water/air exchanger that has a 4kW capacity. This heat exchanger also works quite effectively when power is increased to about 210kW. Remember in your design considerations that you want a reasonable store of water in the actual heat exchanger (2 or 3 litres at least) to help absorb the temperature spikes.

The front-mounted radiator for the water/air intercooler should be completely separate to the engine cooling radiator. Some turbo trucks use the engine coolant to cool the water/air intercooler, but their efficiency is much reduced by taking this approach. Suitable radiators that can be used include large oil coolers, car air conditioning condenser cores, and scrap domestic air conditioning condensers. If you use a car airconditioning condenser there is likely to be available a small dedicated electric fan that attaches to the core easily. This fan can be triggered to aid cooling when the vehicle is stationary. The radiator should at least match (and preferably) exceed the cooling capacity of the heat exchanger, but again finding proper specifications is often difficult. The Subaru Liberty (Legacy) RS with the 4kW heat exchanger uses quite a small radiator, only 45 x 35 x 3cm.

An electric pump is the simplest way of circulating the water, with the type of pump chosen influenced by how the pump is to be operated. Some factory systems have the pump running at low speed continuously, switching to high speed at certain combinations of throttle position and engine airflow. If you follow a similar approach, the pump that is chosen must be capable of continuous operation. Another approach is to trigger the pump only when on boost, or to trigger a timing circuit that keeps the pump running for another (say) 30 seconds after the engine is off-boost. The latter type of operation will mean that the pump operating time is drastically reduced over continuous running.

Twelve volt water pumps fall into two basic types - impeller and diaphragm. An impeller pump is of the low pressure, high flow type. In operation it is quiet with low vibration levels. A diaphragm pump can develop much higher pressures but generally with lower flows. A diaphragm pump is noisy and must be rubber-mounted in a car.

Suitable impeller type pumps are used in boats as bilge pumps and for deck washing. They are relatively cheap and have very high flows - 30 litres a minute is common. However, they are not designed for continuous operation and generally don't have service kits available for the repair of any worn out parts. Diaphragm pumps are used to spray agricultural chemicals and to supply the pressurised water for use in boat and caravan showers and sinks. They are available in very durable designs suitable for continuous running and have repair kits available. Flows of up to 20 litres a minute are common and they develop enough pressure (45 psi) to push the water through the front mounted radiator and heat exchanger without any problems.

The factory water/air intercooler system in the Subaru Liberty RS uses an impeller-type pump rated at 15 litres a minute (all flow figures are open-flow). It is automatically switched from low to high speed as required. This is an ideal pump because it was designed by Subaru to circulate the water in a water/air intercooling system! However, it is a very expensive to buy new, but if one can be sourced secondhand it is ideal.

A cheap and simple impeller pump is the Whale GP99 electric pump. It is so small that the in-line pump can be supported by the hoses that connect to it. It flows 11 litres a minute and has 12mm hose fittings. It is 136 x 36mm in size and is suitable for discontinuous operation. This pump is available from marine and caravan suppliers.

The Flojet 4100-143 4000 is a diaphragm pump suitable for water/air intercooler use. The US-manufactured pump uses a permanent magnet brush-type fan-cooled motor with ball-bearings and is fully rebuildable. The pumping head uses four diaphragms which are flexed by a wobble plate attached to the motor's shaft. The 19 litre/minute pump uses ¾ inch fittings and is 230mm long and 86mm in diameter. It is available from companies supplying agricultural spray equipment.

The Flojet pump needs to be mounted either vertically with the pump head at the bottom, or horizontally with the vent slots in the head facing downwards. This is to stop any fluid draining into the motor if there are any sealing problems in the pump head. At its peak pressure of 280 kPa (40 psi), the pump can draw up to 14 amps; however, in intercooler operation the pressure is vastly less and so the pump draws only about 5.5 amps at 12 volts. The pump is noisy (as all diaphragm pumps are) but mounting it on a rubber gearbox crossmember mount effectively quietens it. Note that these pumps are much louder when mounted to the car's bodywork than they are when sitting on the bench!

Control Systems

As already indicated, there are a number of ways of controlling the pump operation. The simplest is to switch the pump on and off with a boost pressure switch. This means that whenever there is positive manifold pressure, the pump circulates the water from the heat exchanger through the radiator and back to the heat exchanger. If boost is used frequently and for only short periods, this approach works well. However, it is better if a timer circuit is used so that the pump continues to operate for a short period after boost is finished.

A suitable pressure switch is an adjustable Hobbs unit (pictured), available from auto instrument suppliers. However, this switch is relatively expensive and a cheaper unit is easily found. Spa bath suppliers stock a pressure-operated switch that is ideal for forced aspirated car use. The pressure switch is designed to work as part of the air-actuated switching system which is used in a spa bath so that bathers don't have to directly operate high voltage switches. The switch triggers at around 1 psi and costs about half that of a traditional automotive pressure switch. If a switching pressure above 1 psi is required, simply tee a variable bleed into the pressure line leading to the switch. Adjusting the amount of bleed will change the switch-on point.

Another approach to triggering pump operation is to use a throttle switch. A micro switch (available cheaply from electronics stores) can be used to turn on the pump whenever a throttle position over (say) half is reached. A cam can be cut from aluminium sheet and attached to the end of the throttle shaft. If shaped with care, it will turn on the switch gently and then keep it switched on at throttle positions greater than the switch-on opening throttle angle.

If a two-speed pump operation is required, the pump can be fed current through a dropping resistor to provide the slow speed. When full speed is required, the dropping resistor can be bypassed. Suitable dropping resistors are the ballast resistors used in older ignition systems or the resistor pack used in series with some injectors. The value of the resistor that is used will depend on the pump current and its other operating characteristics. In all cases, the resistor will need to dissipate quite a lot of power and so will need to be of the high wattage, ceramic type. The resistor will get very hot and can be placed on a transistor-type heat sink mounted within the airstream, perhaps behind the grille. When experimenting with resistors and a pump, you should know that placing the multiple resistors in parallel will increase pump speed while wiring the resistors in series will slow the pump.

Another approach is to use a temperature switch, so that the pump doesn't run when the intake air is not actually hot. This situation can occur on boost if the intake air temperature is very low because the day is cold. Overly cold intake air can cause atomisation problems, although this is not normally a problem in a high performance car being driven hard! However, running the pump when the intake air is perhaps only 5? is pointless and it can be avoided by placing a normally-open temperature switch in series with the boost pressure or throttle position switches. If the switch closes at temperatures above (say) 30 degrees, the pump will operate only when it actually needs to. A range of low cost temperature switches is available from RS Components (stores world-wide). Note that in all pump control systems a relay should be used to operate the pump.

The Water Plumbing

The most obvious place for the pump to be within the system is immediately after the radiator, so that it is then subjected only to relatively cool water temperatures. However, this can't always be done because some designs of pump are reluctant to suck through the restriction posed by the radiator. Depending on the design of the radiator, its flow restriction may be substantial. During the assembly of the system it is therefore wise to set it all up on the bench. Check water flows with the pump running (at different speeds, if this is the approach to be taken) and with the pump in different positions within the system. The pump position that yields the greatest water flow should be the one adopted - even if that places the pump immediately after the heat exchanger. In practice, the temperature of the water exiting the heat exchanger will not be extremely high if the water volume circulating through the system is adequate.

A header tank should be positioned at the highest point of the system. This should incorporate a filler cap and can actually be part of the heat exchanger if required. Note that a water/air system can be pressurised if required by the use of a radiator-type sealing cap. Be careful that the system design allows air to be bled from any spots where it will become trapped. Air in the system degrades performance and can cause pump problems. A filter placed in front of the pump is a good idea and very cheap water filters can be found in the garden irrigation section of hardware stores. These filters use a fine plastic mesh design and can be easily placed in-line.

Selecting an Intercooling System

Both air/air and water/air systems have their own benefits and disadvantages. Air/air systems are generally lighter than water/air, especially when the mass of the water (1kg a litre!) is taken into account. An air/air system is less complex and if something does go wrong (the intercooler develops a leak for example), the engine behaviour will normally change noticeably. This is not the case with water/air, where if a water hose springs a leak or the pump ceases to work it will not be immediately obvious. However, an air/air intercooler uses much longer ducting and it can be very difficult to package a bulky air/air core at the front of the car - and get the ducts to it! Finally, an air/air intercooler is normally cheaper than a water/air system.

A water/air intercooler is very suitable where the engine bay is tight. Getting a couple of flexible water hoses to a front radiator is easy and the heat exchanger core can be made quite compact. A water/air system is very suitable for a road car, with the thermal mass of the water meaning that temperature spikes are absorbed with ease. However, note that if driven hard and then parked, the water within the system will normally become quite warm through underbonnet heat soak. This results in high intake air temperatures after the car is re-started as the hot water takes some time to cool down.




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Re: LudeSPEED Performance ~99-01 (Archive)

#3

Post by MustardCat » 22 Nov 2017, 06:19

Phase 1 Production Pictures


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This is a good shot of the tubes.

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Here is a close shot of the custom front motor mount bracket. This is needed to free up valuable space for the turbo. The turbo in the picture is small but a larger hybrid T3/T4 will be going in soon.

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Nice shot of the huge downpipe :)

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Can O' worms :)

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Nice view of the hair dryer!

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Overhead shot of the manifold.

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This is a shot of my engine. Only mods are a home-made intake, painted valve cover and home-made 2.5 mandrel bent exhaust . Notice the battery is gone to make room for turbo components.

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This is the patient. She is in much need of attention.

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Gotta get that turbo in there soon! Or I might have a nervous breakdown.

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These are the tools of the trade. On the left is a plama cutter that cuts metal by blowing compressed air that has been heated to 10,000 (or something like that) degrees through the metal. On the right is a Miller MIG welder, very useful.

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Re: LudeSPEED Performance ~99-01 (Archive)

#4

Post by MustardCat » 22 Nov 2017, 06:21

Phase 2 Production Pictures

Current Turbo Kit Details

Here it is!! Manifold #2. There are more pictures below of the completed manifold

I have finished the second manifold. This manifold feeds the exhaust into a Garrett T-25 turbo. This is the stock turbo for the 95-99 Mitsubishi Eclipse. I bought it used from a guy who upgraded his turbo to something larger. He told me that this turbo would push 18 psi no problem on his Eclipse so I think it will do a very good job on the 2.0 liter Prelude motor. I believe that it will make more power on the Honda motor for the following reasons. To start, the Honda motor was made to make good power as a naturally aspirated motor so it "breathes" very well. On top of that, Honda heads are known to flow extremely well. The 95-99 Eclipse is also known to have a small throttle body and intake ports, which is not the case with the Honda motor, so at the same psi, the Prelude motor should make more power.
The picture below shows the T-25 mounted with the bracket that I made for just that purpose, to holds the turbo in place. This accomplishes two things: one, it holds the turbo in place so I can fit the manifold tubes from the head flange to the turbine flange. Two, I keep the bracket on the turbo for support so the manifold does not have to support the weight of the turbo. This prevents the manifold from cracking under the stress of making 300 HP. What is very nice about the T-25 is that it has a 90 degree bend built into the outlet. This directs the air in the direction it needs to go. Other turbo kits that use T-3 or T-4 turbos have to use an elbow in the piping. Anyway, also notice the motor mount bracket in the picture. The one in the picture is ugly as hell becuase it was the prototype, but I use it to help me determine where the turbo needs to be.

Click here to see a completed bracket.


In the left picture you can see the head flange sitting on the exhaust studs. I have developed a method to drill the holes perfectly so the flange slides right on the exhaust studs, like it should. I did not use this method when I made my first flange and it literally took me about 1 1/2 hours to get the flange to fit on the head. And even then, it was still tighter than I wanted it to be, because the metal should have room to expand when it heats up. I had to drill out 5 of the 9 manifold holes oversized and it made the metal very thin around the holes at the edge of the flange. I left far more metal around the ports and mounting holes on the new manifold as you can see in the picture. All this adds to reliability and longevity of the manifold. You can also see how the turbo is positioned, and how the compressor outlet is angled. In the picture on the right, you can see how much more metal there is on the new manifold versus the first manifold I made.





The pictures below are of the finished manifold. I am VERY happy with how it came out. It looks good and I know it will work right. I am selling this piece and I will keep in close contact with that person to find out just how well it worked.

The pictures below show the turbo support bracket.

The red arrow above points out where the bracket bolts to the turbo. The picture below is a fairly clear shot of the bracket and how it bolts to the engine block. You can also see the downpipe complete with oxygen sensor nuts welded in.


Copyright © Tom Coleman 1999
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Re: LudeSPEED Performance ~99-01 (Archive)

#5

Post by MustardCat » 22 Nov 2017, 06:25

Installation Pictures from 4/19/99

This page is about the install of my first attempt at turbocharging my other Prelude. This is not the bolt on turbo kit described in other areas of the page. I will have some pages on that install posted soon.

Click on any image to view a larger version.



The tubular manifold with header wrap to keep under-hood heat to a minimum.


Placement of the intercooler with front bumper cover in place. I like how the intercooler is quite visible :)


Here is a picture of me and the downpipe just after I finished modifying it to fit in the car. The modified version is actually alot better looking than the prototype, and more importantly, it fits.


This is a shot of the manifold bolted into place and the downpipe attached. The oil lines have not been connected yet.


Overall shot of the kit components. Intercooler with intercooler pipes and hoses, manifold sticking out of the top.


Upper intake pipe with HKS Blow off Valve


Intercooler pipe from turbo compressor to intercooler


Oil feed and oil return lines


Here is the Vortec Boost Dependant Regulator nestled in the engine bay. It fits perfectly right where it needs to go


Intercooler pipes consist of five sections. Engine compartment sections are red and bumper sections are painted clear so they are visible through the grill. You can also see how the power steering hose had to be relocated. Future manifold designs will make accomodate the hose in its stock location so you won't have to worry about it.

Copyright © Tom Coleman 1999

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Re: LudeSPEED Performance ~99-01 (Archive)

#6

Post by PeteGeoffrion » 29 Nov 2017, 23:52

Wow, Tom Coleman. I forgot about this site but do remember looking at these pictures in HS. Look at those manifold welds.... :icon_eh:
Pete aka LudeAEM

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